TIPPLE TIMES

TIPPLE Tuesday:
160 Years of Blending

 


Dewar's 12 year old blended scotch whisky

 

blood and sand cocktail recipe with dewar's 12 year old blended scotch whiskyTommy Dewar loved film. He made the first ever cinema advert for a drink. This delicious cocktail takes its name and inspiration from the 1922 silent movie with Rudolph Valentino. In the film, he plays a matador who dies in the arena by his own reckless behavior, having lost his true love.

BLOOD AND SAND
2 parts DEWAR’S 12 Year Old Blended Scotch Whisky
1 part cherry liqueur
1 part Martini and Rossi Red
1 part fresh squeezed orange juice

Put all ingredients into a cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Shake well to mix & chill. Strain into a chilled martini glass and garnish with a twist of fresh orange zest.


 

DARJEELING COOLER with DEWAR'S 12 Year Old  Blended Scotch Whisky

Whisky blenders and tea blenders work well together. The honey and heather in DEWAR’S match the tea’s tannins in this elegant drink.

DARJEELING COOLER
2 parts DEWAR’S 12 Year Old
Blended Scotch Whisky
2 1/2 parts chilled Darjeeling tea
2/3 part heather honey syrup

Stir the ingredients together in a large glass with a generous serving of ice. Garnish optional.


 

NEW YORK SOUR with DEWAR'S 12 Year Old  Blended Scotch Whisky An all-time classic. The texture and flavour perfectly matches the citrus and vanilla in DEWAR’S 12.

NEW YORK SOUR
2 parts DEWAR’S 12 Year Old
Blended Scotch Whisky
1 part fresh squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoonful of white caster sugar
1 dash egg whites
Dash of Angostura bitters

Put all the ingredients into a cocktail shaker and fill with ice. Shake vigorously until you get a foamy texture, then strain into a sour glass. Garnish with a dash of Angostura bitters. Egg whites are an optional extra but they’ll add more froth to your cocktail.


 

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Quiz

1. Whisky distillation in Scotland can trace its roots back to the early Celts, although it’s unlikely we would recognise or enjoy the fiery spirit they produced. This early spirit was known by what Gaelic name?

a. aqua vitae.
b. Té Bheag
c. Poit Dhubh
d. uisge beatha

2. Whisky distilling soon proved popular in Scotland and became part of the social life. However, in the 17th Century, whisky production was driven underground – why?

a. Whisky was banned in Scotland
b. Beer became very popular
c. Taxes on malt and whisky were introduced.
d. The English started producing whisky

3. Smuggling and illicit distilling then became the norm for many Scots. By the mid 19th century, more than half the whisky in Scotland was drunk without the payment of Excise Duty. Approximately how many illicit stills were being confiscated each year?

a. 16,000
b. 10,000
c. 14,000
d. 12,000

4. What type of previously used oak casks are most preferred for the maturation process?

a. Cognac
b. Port
c. Sherry
d. Beer

5. Whisky production had so far only been of malt whisky and in small amounts. However, in 1831 the Patent Still was invented which allowed a continuous distillation process and thus enabled the introduction of grain whisky. Who invented the new still?

a. Aeneas Coffey
b. John Loudon McAdam
c. James Naysmith
d. David Dunbar Buick

Answers below


how to taste whisky by dewar's

Follow the link on how – How to Taste Whisky – Courtesy of DEWAR’S

 


 

Answers:

1. Whisky distillation in Scotland can trace its roots back to the early Celts, although it’s unlikely we would recognise or enjoy the fiery spirit they produced. This early spirit was known by what Gaelic name?

a. aqua vitae.
b. Té Bheag
c. Poit Dhubh
d. uisge beatha – The translation is “water of life”. Aqua vitae is the Latin version, while the other two are actually brands of whisky. The name “Whisky” derives from “uisge” which is pronounced “oosh – kay”.

2. Whisky distilling soon proved popular in Scotland and became part of the social life. However, in the 17th Century, whisky production was driven underground – why?

a. Whisky was banned in Scotland
b. Beer became very popular
c. Taxes on malt and whisky were introduced – The Scottish Parliament introduced taxes and these were increased following the Act of Union in 1707. Part of the aim was to try and tame the Scottish clans.
d. The English started producing whisky

3. Smuggling and illicit distilling then became the norm for many Scots. By the mid 19th century, more than half the whisky in Scotland was drunk without the payment of Excise Duty. Approximately how many illicit stills were being confiscated each year?

a. 16,000
b. 10,000
c. 14,000 – One of the Scottish nobles then suggested that the Government could make money from whisky production and the Excise Act of 1823 was passed which allowed distillation of whisky in return for a fee of £10.
d. 12,000

4. What type of previously used oak casks are most preferred for the maturation process?

a. Cognac
b. Port
c. Sherry – All the can be used. However, Sherry casks are preferred, although bourbon casks are also popular. The type of cask contributes towards the overall colour of the final product.
d. Beer

5. Whisky production had so far only been of malt whisky and in small amounts. However, in 1831 the Patent Still was invented which allowed a continuous distillation process and thus enabled the introduction of grain whisky. Who invented the new still?

a. Aeneas Coffey – Naysmith invented the steam hammer, McAdam invented a new process for building roads and Buick went to America and founded the Buick car company. Coffey wasn’t even Scottish – depending on your source, he was either born in Dublin or Calais!
b. John Loudon McAdam
c. James Naysmith
d. David Dunbar Buick

 

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