TIPPLE TIMES

TIPPLE TIMES:
Happy Bourbon Day!

national bourbon day, june 14th

Celebrate National Bourbon Day. Your customers don’t have to live in Kentucky to raise a toast! Try these unusual bourbon recipes for your next special.

Also take our bourbon quiz.


Kiss and Tell national bourbon day, kiss and tell cocktail recipe, maker's mark
1 1/2 Ounces Maker’s Mark Bourbon
3 Ounces Apple Juice
1/2 Cup Sugar
1 Tablespoon Crystalized Ginger
1 Wedge Lemon
1 Dash Bitters (Opt.)
1 Maraschino Cherry (Opt.)
1 Dash Club Soda (Opt.)

  • You can make this drink either on the rocks (with ice) or up (in a martini glass). It looks pretty classy in a martini glass.
  • Start by combining bourbon, apple juice, and bitters if you’re using bitters in a mixing glass or shaker with a few handfuls of ice.
  • Stir well with a spoon to chill the drink.
  • In a small food processor, coffee grinder, or with a mortar and pestle, combine sugar and crystallized ginger. Pulse to combine and make ginger sugar.
  • Rub the rim of your glass with a lemon wedge to wet it, then dip the glass in the ginger sugar to give it a nice rim.
  • Add a maraschino cherry to the bottom of your glass if you want. Then add all the chilled drink. Try to pour carefully so it doesn’t mess up the pretty rim!
  • If you want, top with a splash of soda which will give the drink some bubbles.

 


 

Bourbon Cocktail national bourbon day, Bourbon Cocktail, hudson bourbon
1 1/2 Ounces Hudson Bourbon
1/2 Ounce Freshly Squeezed
Lemon Juice
1/4 Ounce Bénédictine D.O.M.
1/4 Ounce Cointreau
Angostura Bitters
Lemon Twist For Garnish
Ice

  • Place a cocktail glass in the freezer to chill.
  • Combine the bourbon, lemon juice, Bénédictine, and Cointreau in a cocktail shaker and fill it halfway with ice.
  • Shake vigorously until the outside of the shaker is frosted.
  • Strain into the chilled cocktail glass, top with a dash of bitters, and garnish with the lemon twist.

 


 

national bourbon day, bourbon ball martini, woodford reserveBourbon Ball Martini

From Cooking with Bourbon
as seen on Food All Puttanesca

3 oz. Wild Turkey Bourbon
3 oz. Creme de Cocao
2 oz. Hazelnut Liqueur (like Frangelico)

Fill a shaker with cracked ice. Combine ingredients, shaking to chill. Strain into a martini glass. Garnish with two bourbon ball chocolates on a skewer.

 


 

Sweet Tea national bourbon day, sweet tea bourbon cocktail, wild turkey bourbonBourbon Cocktail
with fresh mint and orange
by Joy the Baker

6 cups water
4 or 5 Black Tea Bags
1/4 Cup Agave Syrup
or Honey
1/4 to 1/2 cup Woodford Reserve Bourbon
4 to 6 Sliced Orange Rounds
6 Sprigs Fresh Mint

Bring water to a boil. Turn off water and add black tea bags. Steep tea for 3 to 5 minutes. Remove the tea bags, place the tea in a large pitcher and let rest in the refrigerator until cold.

Place agave, bourbon, orange slices and fresh mint in a medium bowl. It the back of a spoon, begin to muddle (or press together) the ingredients. The oranges will release come juice, the mint will become fragrant, and the bourbon will tickle your nose. It’ll smell delicious. Once the mixture is pressed together, and the flavors are extracted, add the mixture to the pitcher of tea. Stir well. Serve over lots of ice (Feel free to strain the orange wedges and the mint leaves before pouring into the pitcher of tea, if you’d like.) For step by step photos.

 


 

QUIZ:

1. Who invented bourbon?
a. Elijah Craig
b. George Washington
c. Robert Samuels

2. What was the first commercial distillery in Kentucky?
a. Maker’s Mark
b. Evan Williams
c. Jim Beam

3. True or False: The Whiskey Rebellion was the first real test of the federal government’s ability to enforce laws.

4. Why did Bill Samuels, Sr. burn the famous family recipe in 1943?
a. He joined the temperance movement that continued after the repeal of Prohibition.
b. The family fought over the rights to the recipe.
c. He wanted to create a new bourbon without the bitterness.

 

Answers below

QUIZ:

1. Who invented bourbon?
a. Elijah Craig
b. George Washington
c. Robert Samuels

a. It’s been said that Elijah Craig invented bourbon in 1789 by aging the already popular corn whiskey, or moonshine. This is a disputed fact; many believe that bourbon was not invented, but instead evolved with many hands in the barrel, so to speak, such as those who emigrated from Pennsylvania because of the Whiskey Excise Tax. It is a fact that in 1789 Elijah Craig, Baptist minister, opened a distillery in Georgetown, Kentucky. Heaven Hill Distillery produces a bourbon named after the “inventor” of bourbon.

2. What was the first commercial distillery in Kentucky?
a. Maker’s Mark
b. Evan Williams
c. Jim Beam

b. In 1783 When Evan Williams opened his distillery on the banks of the Ohio River in Louisville, it was the first commercial distillery in Kentucky. The bourbon that still bears the distiller’s name is one of the popular bourbons today.

3. True or False: The Whiskey Rebellion was the first real test of the federal government’s ability to enforce laws.

True: Farmers, primarily in western Pennsylvania, protest against the 1791 Whiskey Excise Tax. President Washington called up 13,000 militia to deal with the rebels, but the band disperse before any conflicts. These events encouraged Kentucky and Tennessee distillers, who were not subject to the federal law at the time. The Whiskey Rebellion was the first real test of the federal government’s ability to enforce laws.

4. Why did Bill Samuels, Sr. burn the famous family recipe in 1943?
a. He joined the temperance movement that continued after the repeal of Prohibition.
b. The family fought over the rights to the recipe.
c. He wanted to create a new bourbon without the bitterness.

c. In 1783 the Samuels Family Tradition Begins. The Samuels family claims the title of oldest bourbon family still going strong. Prior to 1840 the Samuels family did not produce bourbon commercially. It wasn’t until T.W. Samuels (grandson to Robert Samuels who created the “secret” family recipe) came along and constructed a distillery at Samuels Depot, Kentucky that the family made a business of bourbon. In 1943, after a break during Prohibition, Bill Samuels Sr. burned that famous family recipe. Bill Sr. wanted to create a bourbon without the bitterness, and so he did: Maker’s Mark. The company is now in the hands of his son, Bill Samuels Jr., who continues the family bourbon tradition today.

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